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TV Recap: ‘The Morning Show,’ Season 2, Episode 2: It’s Like the Flu

Episode two of the new season of The Morning Show is a triggering flashback to early last year, just by its title: It’s Like the Flu. Who among us doesn’t know someone who said those words, or even said that line themselves? It was a time of rumblings and uncertainty – the uncertainty certainly remains today – but little did we know what we were in for.

The inherent problem with something like The Morning Show tackling the COVID outbreak is it feels a year too late. In the world the show occupies, it’s just starting. In real life, who’s to say what stage we are in, but we are past the “It’s like the flu” stage (hopefully). Of course, delaying shooting a show, filming it, and getting it ready to air takes time, so shows that try to tackle the moment are always going to feel a bit late to the discussion. Question is, how much do we want to start over something we haven’t finished?

Meanwhile, the always scheming Cory (Billy Crudup) is trying to reboot The Morning Show and works overtime to wrangle Alex (Jennifer Aniston) and Bradley (Reese Witherspoon) into attending a dinner. Bradley, among many others at the dinner, still aren’t pleased with the trajectory of the show and a lot of the frustration is pointed at Alex for blowing it all up and then disappearing. She’s ready to come back and make nice, but is everyone else ready to have her? Steve Carrell’s Mitch Kessler makes a bigger appearance in the second episode, off in Italy, where he feels safe from the public shame of New York City, but perhaps he isn’t as safe as he hoped.

Season two of The Morning Show has benefited from picking up right where it left off, but it seems to be settling into a checklist of topical issues. There hasn’t been a distinct focus of what this season is setting out to accomplish.

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Written by Matt Passantino

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