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Box Office Report for the Week of January 23

Sony

Although last weekend saw the brand new fifth Scream film take the top spot at the box office, this weekend that title of first place goes back over to Jon WattsSpider-Man: No Way Home. This weekend, the superhero epic took home $14.13 million, That brings the Marvel blockbuster to $721.01M, putting it in fourth place all-time domestically (the No. 3 spot is held by Avatar, which has a lifetime gross of $760.5M in North America).

But coming in second place was the aforementioned Scream, which managed to bring in a weekend total of $12.4 million, down 59% from its $30.02M three-day opening. The film has earned $51.35M to date and has already far surpassed the $38.2M lifetime total of 2011’s Scream 4, the last entry in the long-running horror series.

In third place is Sing 2, bringing in a weekend total of $5.71 million in its fifth weekend of release. The animated sequel animated sequel has a healthy $128.41M to date.

Here’s the full list of the top ten films of the week:

  1. Spider-Man: No Way Home – $14.12M (-30%) – 3,705 theatres
  2. Scream – $12.4M (-59%) – 3,666 theatres
  3. Sing 2 – $5.71M (-28%) – 3,434 theatres
  4. Redeeming Love – $3.71M – 1,903 theatres
  5. The King’s Man – $1.77M (-20%) – 2,360 theatres
  6. The 355 – $1.6M (-30%) – 2,609 theatres
  7. American Underdog – $1.22M (-22%) – 2,164 theatres
  8. The King’s Daughter – $750K – 2,170 theatres
  9. West Side Story – $698K (-25%) – 1,290 theatres
  10. Licorice Pizza – $683K (-18%) – 772 theatres

Source: Box Office Pro

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Written by Caillou Pettis

Caillou Pettis is a professional film critic and has been writing about film for several years across various different publications. Ever since the age of nine, film and the art of filmmaking have been his number one passion. When hes

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